Gubbeen

The Story of a Working Farm and Its Foods

Price $35.00
ISBN 9781909487246
Format Hardback
Published May 7th 2015
Size 8.4 x 10.3 inches
Pages 240

Description

This is an exceptional insight into the running of a farm that follows traditional ways of growing food and rearing animals.
Tom and Giana and their children, Fingal and Clovisse, take you through the inner workings of each of their specialties: looking after animals (poultry, pigs and cows), cheese-making, smoking meats and growing your own fruits and vegetables.
Tom has worked the land all his life, following the old farming ways of his forbearers while Giana controls the dairy as well as keeping a keen eye on the poultry. She also manages the award-winning Gubben cheese, internationally renowned as one of the best farmhouse cheeses in Ireland. Fingal uses the pigs to make bacon and smoked goods from the Smokehouse (and has a sideline in creating beautiful knives for famous chefs) including smoked Gubben cheese, and generously uses herbs from his sister’s garden for his cures. Clovisse grows chemical-free vegetables, fruit, herbs and flowers in the Kitchen Garden, and makes use of the waste by composting or feeding it to the chickens and pigs.
Readers will also find appetizing recipes that celebrate the farm's produce. Anyone interested in cheese, charcuterie or smoked produce will learn from a family of long-standing tradition. Delight in the homey undertones of each family member's voice as the Fergusons share their time-honored philosophy and day-to-day stories over some wholesome meals.

Author Information

As a child, Giana Ferguson helped to make the cheese on her father's small farm in the mountains above Alora in Spain. In her early twenties, she moved to Ireland where she met and married Tom Ferguson, whose family has lived on the Gubbeen farm for many generations. They started making cheese in 1979 and its popularity and recognition have steadily grown. The uniqueness of the cheese is proved by the fact the bacteria that helps to develop the rind has been named microbacterium gubbeenense.

See Inside

« Back